Dr. Ben Carson and healthcare

we the people

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

Ben Carson’s feels that the preamble’s “We the people” means that citizens, “We the people” ought to care for each other in times of need; others say that the “…general Welfare” clause of the preamble means that government should meet the needs of the people with their healthcare.

Nowhere in the Constitution is it said that caring for our health is the role of our federal government. The closest that the Constitution comes to this is in it’s reference to the ‘general Welfare.’ However, if the reference to the general Welfare of the people referred to the health of the people of the nation that it had just founded, don’t you think our framers would have elaborated upon the meaning of the ‘general Welfare’ clause? Wouldn’t the framers have discussed-if ever so briefly-the role of the newly found government in our nation’s health?

The framers could not have foreseen that healthcare would have grown to become the multi-trillion dollar industry, and that bake sales and barn raising would eventually not be enough to care for the health of the nation.

In the Constitution, there were delegated (enumerated), implied and inherent powers given to the federal government; but elaboration of these was found in the 10th amendment. “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, not prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

Since the federal government was not given the power over it’s citizens healthcare, that power was given to the states or to the people. Did you have a vote? I didn’t have a vote in amending the Constitution. In absence of the people having power over healthcare, and the federal government lacking the Constitutional power, don’t the states have that power according to the 10th amendment?

The Founders and Federalism, accessed online February 24, 2016, at http://www.ushistory.org/gov/3a.asp, <em>The American Government Online

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